Who We Help

Who We Help

We support around 3,500 homeless people each year. We are a small charity, and are able to reach so many homeless people by working in partnership with organisations that provide services. The majority of the individuals we support are in supported living schemes run by Riverside Care and Support. Our There are around 100 schemes across England, including projects for people with drug or alcohol dependency; accommodation for homeless families; mother and baby units; women’s refuges; temporary housing for ex-Services personnel; accommodation for people with learning disabilities; and young people’s foyers.

We also support Genesis Trust, and contribute to the Migrants’ Destitution Fund, which is run by Housing Justice.

Church Housing Trust supports people who have been homeless. People are homeless for many different reasons. Some people have a happy home but lose it because their relationship breaks down, or they get ill, or lose their job, or someone dies, or they get into debt. Often it is a combination of these things.

These people are often without the emotional or financial resources to establish a home for themselves. Some people are homeless because, in spite of having a job, they simply cannot afford a home. Each homeless person has a different story, and needs different kinds of support and encouragement.

Stories about our work:

Individuals that have slept rough for a long time are harder for services to help. On the street they risk being attacked, robbed, or becoming seriously ill. Their own sense of self-worth is damaged by their experiences: people who have slept rough for long periods have commented they ‘didn’t feel they deserved better’.

They often mistrust support staff and may have had a previous bad experience, such as being forced to stay in an environment with others they found threatening, or in cramped and unhygienic conditions. Many have complex needs and or an addiction, which the help on offer did not tackle. Church Housing Trust supports innovative projects that can approach these individuals, like Street Buddies. We also fund support at schemes that look after individuals with the most complex needs, even in the face of cuts to other services.

Stories about our work:

A large number of veterans find it difficult to adjust to ‘civvy street’, their nickname for civilian life, when they leave the army. Without a support network of family or friends, they often don’t know how to access housing, and have little experience of how to get a job. This can happen at any age, whether they retire at the end of a career, or have to leave due to injury after signing up at a young age. Service can be psychologically, as well as physically, traumatic, and they may require counselling or extra support to deal with anxiety or PTSD. We help to fund life skills lessons such as cooking and applying for housing, keep fit, vocational training, and counselling for mental health issues.

Stories about our work:

A third of people using homelessness services have needs related to their mental health. Therapeutic activities, counselling, befriending, confidence building, volunteering, training opportunities

Stories about our work:

More than half of people using homelessness services are under 25 years old. It was reported in 2015 that on any given night in the UK there may be 300,000 young people sleeping in an unsafe place, such as in a car, or on the streets.

They are likely to have left home as young as 15, due to abuse, relationship breakdown, or overcrowding. Some have come out of the care system with no support network to turn to. Some are able sofa surf or stay with friends for a short time, often while trying to find work or complete their education.

Once they are safe with a roof over their heads, we fund a large variety of training and volunteering opportunities for young people in this situation. Youth foyers provide these, plus the chance to learn other life skills such as managing rent and bill payments, cooking, and applying for work.

Stories about our work:

More than half of people using homelessness services are under 25 years old. It was reported in 2015 that on any given night in the UK there may be 300,000 young people sleeping in an unsafe place, such as in a car, or on the streets.

They are likely to have left home as young as 15, due to abuse, relationship breakdown, or overcrowding. Some have come out of the care system with no support network to turn to. Some are able sofa surf or stay with friends for a short time, often while trying to find work or complete their education.

Once they are safe with a roof over their heads, we fund a large variety of training and volunteering opportunities for young people in this situation. Youth foyers provide these, plus the chance to learn other life skills such as managing rent and bill payments, cooking, and applying for work.

Stories about our work:

More than half of people using homelessness services are under 25 years old. It was reported in 2015 that on any given night in the UK there may be 300,000 young people sleeping in an unsafe place, such as in a car, or on the streets.

They are likely to have left home as young as 15, due to abuse, relationship breakdown, or overcrowding. Some have come out of the care system with no support network to turn to. Some are able sofa surf or stay with friends for a short time, often while trying to find work or complete their education.

Once they are safe with a roof over their heads, we fund a large variety of training and volunteering opportunities for young people in this situation. Youth foyers provide these, plus the chance to learn other life skills such as managing rent and bill payments, cooking, and applying for work.

Stories about our work:

More than half of people using homelessness services are under 25 years old. It was reported in 2015 that on any given night in the UK there may be 300,000 young people sleeping in an unsafe place, such as in a car, or on the streets.

They are likely to have left home as young as 15, due to abuse, relationship breakdown, or overcrowding. Some have come out of the care system with no support network to turn to. Some are able sofa surf or stay with friends for a short time, often while trying to find work or complete their education.

Once they are safe with a roof over their heads, we fund a large variety of training and volunteering opportunities for young people in this situation. Youth foyers provide these, plus the chance to learn other life skills such as managing rent and bill payments, cooking, and applying for work.

Stories about our work: